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Horsetail Falls 2015 (Yosemite National Park)

Horsetail Falls 2015 (Yosemite National Park)

Each year thousands of photographers visit Yosemite National Park in hopes of seeing the famous ”Fire Falls” event at Horsetail Falls. Horsetail Falls is a seasonal waterfall that only flows after rain or as the snow melts above El Capitan. It’s located on the west side of El Capitan and can be viewed from a number of locations. This event occurs when the sun is in just the right spot to reflect off the granite behind the waterfall and cause it to light up. The sun also needs to be close to the horizon to give off its orange light and thus turn the waterfall orange. It’s amazing how much like fire and lava the water becomes! The event starts around Valentines Day each year and continues for about 2 weeks. Read more...

Drought's Amnesia

Drought's Amnesia

We may be in the middle of a serious drought in the West Coast (California specifically) but you never would have known that while visiting Oregons Columbia River Gorge. Filled with stunning waterfalls, luscious vegetation, ferns, flowing creeks, and beautiful views, the Columbia River Gorge is a popular spring destination. Throw in the fact that some of the best beer in the country is brewed here and youve got an ultimate weekend get-away

Andy and I spent a long weekend visiting waterfalls and drinking beer. Wed wake up early, hike to a gorgeous waterfall, take photos, spend the rest of the afternoon at a few breweries, then head back to another waterfall for sunset. Theres so many waterfalls that its quite difficult to choose which ones to visit

Fairy Falls was one of the first that we visited and might be my favorite partially because its one of the easier waterfalls to photograph but also because of its amazing fan-like shape with green ferns growing all around it.

Nikon D800 w/Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED AF-S:
24mm, f/10, 0.5 sec, ISO 100

Tasty Falls

Tasty Falls

If there is one kind of photography that pushed me over the edge a number of years ago and convinced me to buy a dSLR it was waterfall photography. I remember when my friend stopped at my apartment and showed me some photos of waterfalls he had taken in Yosemite with his Canon Rebel. I was sold. Ever since then Ive always held a special place in my heart for waterfalls. When you can combine lush green mossy scenes with waterfalls they become even more spectacular. Ive always loved looking at photos of the Columbia River Gorge in Oregon but visiting with my own two eyes is more difficult than say, a drive somewhere local. When Willie made me aware of our own mossy falls I knew I had to visit

Although it hadnt rained in a week and the water level started to die out, Sammi and I were surely in for a good morning when we found our way to this waterfall. Thanks to some locals pointing out WATERFALL – with some big giant arrows etched in the dirt, we made our way down this steep ravine and over to the falls. I loved the way the moss, the fallen tree branches, and the 2-pronged waterfall all come together here. I made sure to walk slightly down-stream to capture some of the motion from the river but not too far that the waterfall became teeny tiny. After enjoying the morning at the waterfall we hiked back up and spent the rest of the day eating yummy food and tasting delicious wine. We couldnt have asked for a better Sunday

Nikon D800 w/Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8 ED-IF AF-S:
17mm, f/11, 0.6 sec, ISO 200

Purchase at Aaron M Photography

Laser Chief

Laser Chief

Willie, Yan, and I had spent the night in Page, AZ and we found ourselves with half a day to kill. We arrived at Lower Antelope Canyon before they opened and were the first ones in the canyon. We didn’t see anyone for over an hour. One of my fellow photographer friends, Jave, has a wonderful photo in Lower Antelope Canyon of light beams in front of the Granite Chief, and we hoped we might be able to replicate his photo.

At some point one of the Navajo guides walked past and I stopped him and asked if he knew what time the light beams crossed in front of the Granite Chief. He told me that it was later in the afternoon but we had a flight to catch and couldn’t wait for that to happen. Willie wanted to get a photograph of the Chief anyways. Willie took some shots and just as we were about to leave I noticed a light beam forming near the eye of the Chief! Sure enough the tiny little light beam grew and grew as the sun came up through the canyon. We stopped and fired a number of photos. I like how this looks like the Chief was Cyclop’s early teacher … look at those laser beams coming out of his eye!

Nikon D800 w/Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED AF-S:
38mm, f/11, 2 sec, ISO 125

Purchase at Aaron M Photography

Winter’s Mark

Winter's Mark

Above: A selectively colored image. I loved the way the sunset touched El Capitan but the snowy scene seemed perfect for Black and White.

Below: The light on El Capitan was so nice on this evening that I couldn’t post just one photo. First, the setting sun imparted the image of a bra onto El Capitan, which I thought was amusing. Next, some color lit up the clouds with a golden hue that also reflected onto El Capitan, Half Dome, and the nearby mountain peaks.

Lost her Painties, by Aaron Meyers


On the top of my photography bucket list has been to witness and photograph a snowy Yosemite. This year I’ve paid close attention to the snow in Yosemite and finally during my Christmas break I had my chance to see Yosemite covered in snow! A giant storm had just hit the Eastern Sierras and dumped about 10 feet of snow (in fact, Kirkwood received 7 feet in ONE DAY!). Willie, Alan, Sammi and I planned on arriving just as the storm cleared. Unfortunately by the time we rented a 4-wheel drive vehicle and made our way through chain control and into Yosemite most of the storm had gone. The radar showed more clouds coming and we held our breath that sunset would be nice.

After visiting several stops around the Yosemite Valley and running into a couple other photographers that we knew we settled on returning to Tunnel View for sunset. Joined by a gazillion other photographers (or a ”meat market” as Breezy would call it) we witnessed a beautiful sunset. Although the clouds did not light up with much color there was an absolutely beautiful stripe of color that appeared on El Capitan, as some clouds made enough room for the light to seep in.

I combined 7 vertical images in Photoshop to create this 2×1 panorama of a snowy Yosemite. With snow on the trees and a pale, boring, blue color in the sky I knew that this photograph had to be done in black and white. I couldn’t help but love the red color that was caste across El Capitan and decided to selectively bring this back in. Fog crept in as the sun began to set and creates a nice mystical mood to the photo.

I printed this as a 24”x48” lustre print on Gatorboard and hung it in my office at my apartment! It looks great on the wall!

Nikon D800 w/Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED AF-S:
70mm, f/11, 1/4 sec, ISO 100
7 images stitched in Photoshop

Purchase at Aaron M Photography

Winter's View

Winter's View

One photo that has been high on my bucket list was a snowy Yosemite photo. Willie and I have been keeping an eye on the recent storms in the Eastern Sierras and a huge one hit over Christmas weekend, dropping over 7 feet of snow in one day in some areas I rented a 4 wheel drive vehicle and Willie, Alan, my girlfriend and I drove into Yosemite just as the storm cleared.

We arrived at Yosemite to see the entire place covered in white It was insanely gorgeous. The storm had moved out a bit quicker than we had hoped and we arrived late, to clear skies. As we looked west we saw another set of clouds coming in and we hoped we might be in luck After scouting several locations we decided that Ansel Adams had it right and we found our way over to Tunnel View for sunset. We were not disappointed Some low fog rolled into the valley, the trees stayed covered in white, and a slit of light made its way onto El Capitan for a beautiful view

To my surprise, my favorite image from the day happened to be one I had not expected at all. An almost full-moon rose just after the sun set, right during blue hour, and everyone raced around to capture the moon rising over Half Dome. I threw on my 80-200mm lens until Alan mentioned, hey, try going wide. By this point I was cold, tired, and ready to get home before the roads turned awful so I fired 1 quick shot, packed up my bags and went to warm up in the car. When I got home I realized how right Alan was I liked this shot more than all my others

In the end we spent twice as much time driving as we did in Yosemite but it was well worth it

Nikon D800 w/Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8G ED AF-S:
55mm, f/11, 30 sec, ISO 200
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